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Sailing Legends - The Story of the World's Greatest Ocean Race

Sailing Legends - The Story of the World's Greatest Ocean Race

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This multilingual edition covers the history of the Whitbread Round the World and Volvo Ocean Races - the Whitbread from 1973-1998, and the Volvo from 2001 onwards. It is hot off the press, so it is right up-to-date. It is almost a history of ocean racing itself; but in terms of the races, it is more than that - it is all so vividly portrayed by spectacular pictures and superb race descriptions and personality insights, that it is a living history. Starting from 1973, with the ‘pioneers’ you’ll meet the famous yachts, and the men and women who challenged what is called ‘The Everest of Ocean Racing’. The names of many of the yachts will trip off the tongue, especialy for older readers; names such as Sayula II , the first winner, Pen Duick II, Flyer, Silk Cut, Illbruck, Steinlager, EF Language, NZ Endeavour and more latterly ABN Amro and Ericsson 4. Then there are the sailing legends such as Chay Blyth, Robin Knox-Johnston, Eric Tabarly, Cornelis Von Rietschoten, Denis Conner, Peter Blake, Paul Cayard, Brad Butterworth, Grant Dalton, Torben Grael, to name only a few of those who have graced these round the world events. The authors trace very race so splendidly that you will almost feel all the drama, from triumphs to tragedies, joy to utter sadness. There are tales of capsizes and remarkable rescues and seamanship; stories of bravery, endurance, determination. It is all about life at the extremes. Life at the extremes? Perhaps the following quotes will give some idea of what it is like on these races: “When I raced towards Cape Horn in 2002 on News Corp we almost died. It was like playing Russian Roulette. There was ice everywhere. You could see most of it during the day, but at night it was quite terrifying. We were sailing blind knowing that there was a good chance you could hit something, but didn’t know what or when. If you said you weren’t scared, I’d say you had something wrong in your head”. HB 176 pages





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